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Sure, Samsung just launched its 105-inch ultrawidescreen, Ultra HD TV but spending $120,000 on such a screen is probably out of reach. So, for the the budget minded-consumer, we'd recommend taking a look at LG's 105-inch 4K beauty. Beyond coming with an integrated speaker, it we're reading this machine-translated Korean press release correctly, it's priced at 120 million won, or about $117,000. That way, you can buy one of these and a nice 65-inch TV for your kids instead of that college education they wanted. During CES we'd heard that the MSRP would be around $70,000 US so we're still hoping for even more savings -- but as much as we like TVs we're not sure any of them are worth even two Teslas.

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Automakers aren't the only ones working to implement self-driving technology. The US Marine Corps has teamed up with TORC Robotics' (among others) to work on a Jeep-esque option outfitted with the company's Ground Unmanned Support Surrogate system -- or GUSS to save the mouthful. Here, GUSS is used to power a self-driving version of the Marine two-seater truck dubbed the Internally Transportable Vehicle (ITV). As the name suggests, the compact option can be carried on a helicopter or plane for deployment, and its beacon can either send it to a specific location or maneuver it via remote control. As you may recall, TORC's GUSS system was installed on a Polaris 6x6 ATV a few years back, so the tech has been through its share of tests. The goal is for the vehicle to be used to deliver supplies (up to 1,600 pounds or evacuate wounded soldiers by determining its own route or being controlled from afar at a speed of 8 MPH. An unmanned ITV reamains in the testing phase, but the team sees similar options in the field in the next five years.

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Syfy is going to try to capture social media lightning in a bottle one more time, with the sequel to last summer's bad-but-popular Sharknado. We're not exactly sure what Sharknado 2: The Second One is about but suspect has some combination of sharks and tornadoes. Fans of quality TV can grab the entire Twin Peaks series on Blu-ray, complete with some new "missing pieces" extras,. Penn & Teller's old UK show Fool Us is going to be re-aired in the US this summer on CW, while NFL action starts to wind back up with the start of preseason football. Finally, PS4 gamers can enjoy a better-looking version of last year's hit The Last of Us with a remastered version hitting shelves tomorrow, and on Netflix season four of The Killing arrives Friday morning. Check after the break for a list of what's new this week plus a few trailers, and drop a note in the comments if you see any highlights we've missed.

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HTC One backside

More than a few eyebrows were raised when talk surfaced of an HTC One for Windows Phone. How close would it be to the Android original? Would it bring anything new to the table? And what's the name, for that matter? Thankfully, sources for Engadget are happy to answer a few questions. For a start, they tell us that the device is tentatively called the "One (M8) for Windows." Yeah, that's not exactly going to roll off the tongue -- the device's codename, W8, is considerably more elegant.

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Many direct current fast chargers aren't exactly practical, even for stores that expect a lot of traffic; they're frequently massive, power-hungry and expensive. BMW knows that's a problem, which is why it just brought its i DC Fast Charger to North America. The device is small and light enough to be wall-mountable, but it can give an i3 an 80 percent charge within 30 minutes; that's very handy if you only need to make a quick stop at a restaurant or the mall. The charger is compatible with EVs from most major automakers (Teslas need not apply), and businesses can put it on ChargePoint's network to either make some cash or simply let drivers know when it's unoccupied.

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It's been coming coming, but Facebook told TechCrunch today that the time is just about here -- starting "over the next few days" everyone will need Messenger to chat directly with their Facebook friends on mobile devices (iOS, Android and Windows Phone). Some users in Europe have seen the change for several months, but Facebook claims their positive response has led to the change rolling out worldwide. Of course, not everyone is going to be happy about downloading a second app to do what one was already capable of -- just ask Foursquare users about Swarm. Facebook says the change will let it focus its development efforts better on the two apps separately, and "avoid confusion" by users, who send about 12 billion messages a day on the platform. So, are you already in love with Chat Heads and ready to make the swap full-time, or -- assuming you still use Facebook -- is this the final straw in sending you elsewhere for your communication needs?

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Facebook is perhaps the most prominent example, but the internet, whether we want to accept it or not, is a gigantic data-mining operation where every thing about us is monitored, measured and experimented with -- even our love life, should we choose. The folks over at online-dating service OKCupid (OKC) have recently detailed, among other things, how they futzed with the site's match-percentage system to see if it'd affect users' messaging habits. To start, OKC wanted to see just how much bearing system had on the likelihood of sending one message. When the service took two people who were actually 30 percent compatible and fudged the numbers by, say, 60 points, the amount of first messages sent naturally increased. As the OKTrends blog notes, that's exactly what was expected because that's how the site's users have more or less been trained; a higher number means a potentially better match. But, as anyone who's used the site can probably attest, one message doesn't mean a whole lot.

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We know Insert Coin contestants shed blood, sweat and tears to complete their masterpieces, so we make sure they get scrutinized by people who know what they're talking about. For this year's event, we gathered a group of judges from different backgrounds to look at, poke and analyze every entry. They're in charge of making sure that the best entries get the coveted prize money and that the winners embody what Insert Coin's all about.

  • Cyril Ebersweiler is the founder of HAXLR8R, an accelerator program for hardware startups based in San Francisco and Shenzhen, China. He also juggles several projects in both countries, including mentoring a number of startups and serving as a board member to Leap Motion.
  • Rahul Sood is just as tireless as Ebersweiler and currently serves as the global head of Microsoft Ventures. Some might remember him as the creator of Voodoo PC, which was eventually snapped up by HP.
  • Ben Einstein describes himself as a "lover of hardware" and is the Managing Director of Bolt, a start-up incubator that focuses on (you guessed it) companies that work on hardware.
  • Devindra Hardawar's probably a familiar name if you tend to visit a certain online publication other than Engadget -- he's a Senior Editor and the lead mobile writer at VentureBeat.

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Face it, the tech industry is obsessed with resolution; we want every display to be high definition, regardless of size. We also want our devices to be affordable, leaving device manufactures with an interesting problem: how do they manufacture low-cost products with high-resolution screens? NVIDIA researchers have one solution -- stack two low-resolution panels on top of each other to increase pixel density on the cheap. The solution is so simple it sounds ridiculous, but apparently, it works.

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